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Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE)

Annotated Bibliography
Works of Rosalie S. Wolf
June 2002


The following annotated bibliography is a tribute to the late Rosalie S. Wolf, Ph.D. — advocate, researcher and author — whose leadership resulted in the recognition of elder abuse as a global problem. The world lost Rosalie, at age 74, to illness on June 26, 2001.

Dr. Wolf's involvement in the field of elder abuse began shortly after she earned a doctorate in social welfare policy with a concentration in aging from Brandeis University. In 1980, she headed a U.S. Administration on Aging evaluation study of model elder abuse intervention programs. She went on to found the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA) in 1986 and the Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect (JEAN) in 1989. Not only did she serve as president of the NCPEA, Dr. Wolf organized and offered on-going assistance to many elder abuse organizations, including the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. She served as a member of the World Health Organization Consulting Group for the World Report on Violence, and was a member of the steering committee of the United Nations International Working Group on Trauma. Her last public appearance took place just weeks before her death, when she gave an "exceptionally elegant and informative review of the history of the field" of elder abuse for the National Academy of Sciences Study Panel on the Risk and Prevalence of Elder Abuse.

For over twenty years, Dr. Wolf authored and edited numerous articles, essays, and books on many of the complexities of elder abuse and neglect. This bibliography only begins to reflect the impact that this advocate and scholar has made on our society.



CANE (Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly) is the nation's largest and most utilized computerized collection of elder abuse materials and resources. With over 3,000 holdings, CANE has the ability to perform customized searches of over 100 keywords producing annotated bibliographies available to the professional community and to the public.

CANE is a service of the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), which is supported by the U.S. Administration on Aging.

The following articles, honoring Dr. Rosalie Wolf's contributions to elder abuse research, are available by request from CANE. Please be aware of each article's file number. The digits following the hyphen in the file numbers indicate the total number of photocopied pages. For example, if the file number is A78-11, then this article (number A78-11) is 11 pages in length. Articles of interest will be forwarded to you at a cost of $.20 per page.

Order from:

CANE
Department of Consumer Studies
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716

PLEASE NOTE THAT A CHECK MADE OUT TO CANE-UD MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR ORDER. For further information on ordering materials, contact CANE at (302) 831-3525, or at [email protected].



  1. N4615-4
    Wolf, R.
    Research
    Prepared for the Medical Forensic Issues Concerning Abuse and Neglect (roundtable discussion) October 18, 2000

    Keywords: Medical forensics, Evaluation (measures/programs)

    In this paper, prepared for the Medical Forensic Issues Concerning Abuse and Neglect roundtable discussion, the author outlines areas for future elder abuse research. She also reports on the findings of a focus group study that indicates a greater need for mutual respect between researchers and practitioners in this field, as well as a higher level of professional coordination, in order for future research to be relevant and practical.


  2. L4541-6
    Wolf, R.
    The Nature and Scope of Elder Abuse
    Generations; Summer 2000

    Keywords: Overview, Historical, Europe, Canada

    In this overview, written as an introduction for the Generations issue dedicated to the awareness of elder abuse, the author provides a history of the recognition of elder mistreatment as a social problem. It includes not only a discussion of definitions, theoretical explanations and consequences of different types of abuse, but also reviews the findings from surveys conducted in the United States, Canada, Finland and the Netherlands. The introduction concludes with an outline of other articles included in this volume. (Available online)


  3. E2746-4
    Wolf, R.
    Risk Assessment Instruments
    National Center on Elder Abuse Newsletter; Vol. 3 (1), September 2000

    Keywords: Risk assessment

    This article discusses various risk assessment tools, including screening instruments used to assess future risk of abuse. Some of the instruments described include the Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Test (H-S/EAST), the Indicators of Abuse Screen, and approaches used by the Illinois and Colorado Adult Protective Services.


  4. K4284-10
    Wolf, R. and Pillemer, K.
    Elder Abuse and Case Outcome
    Journal of Applied Gerontology; Vol. 19 (2) 203-220, June 2000

    Keywords: Outcome measures, Case management

    This research project was designed to examine case resolution as an outcome measurement for assessing the effectiveness of elder abuse interventions. Fifty-nine abuse cases from three projects (based in New York City, San Francisco and Madison, Wisconsin) were assessed upon intake and then reassessed six months later or when the case was closed. The findings of resolved and unresolved cases are reported, contrasted and discussed. Results suggest that victims of certain types of abuse and victims unwilling to accept services or change living arrangements are less likely to have their cases resolved.


  5. N4737-21
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse
    From Aggression and Violence - an Introductory Text; Allyn & Bacon, Needham Heights, MA, 2000

    Keywords: Overview, Historical

    In this chapter, the author provides a comprehensive outline of the topic of elder mistreatment. First seen as the problems of vulnerable adults in need of protective services (1960's), the perspective shifted as older adults were viewed as being victimized, exploited and neglected (late 1970's and into the 1980's). The influences of child protective legislation, the domestic violence field, and the criminal justice system are discussed. Hudson's five-level taxonomy of "violence involving older adults" is briefly described as the framework for this discussion of domestic conflict. Reviews of the major prevalence studies are also included. Case scenarios are used to illustrate risk factors and interventions of specific types of abuse and neglect.


  6. K4174-17
    Wolf, R.
    Research Agenda - A Research Agenda on Abuse of Older Persons and Adults with Disabilities
    National Center on Elder Abuse
    Funded in parted by the Administration on Aging - Grant No. 90-AP-2144, November, 1999

    Keywords: Mentally impaired, Developmentally disabled

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA) and the National Association of Adult Protective Services (NAAPSA), under the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), developed a Research Agenda on Abuse and Neglect of Older Persons and Disabled Adults. This report includes a description of the four methods used to collect the data, the master list of researchable questions from surveys and workshops, and the ten research topics that received the highest number of votes at the 1998 NAAPSA Conference. (Available online)


  7. M20-165
    Johnson, T. and Wolf, R., editors
    Elder Mistreatment: Ethical Issues, Dilemmas, and Decision Making - A Trainer's Manual
    National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse - Grant No. 90-AM-0660, 1998

    Keywords: Curriculum-training materials

    This Trainer's Manual is intended as a companion to Elder Mistreatment: Ethical Issues, Dilemmas, and Decisions. Three cases of potential or actual mistreatment are presented and then discussed from the perspective of physical and mental health clinicians, social workers, lawyers and clergy. The purpose is to show how the various professions approach the same ethical issues and dilemmas and how ethical practice can be integrated into the multidisciplinary context. It is intended for use by instructors, not for distribution to trainees.


  8. J4123-37
    Wolf, R.
    Support Groups for Older Victims of Domestic Violence: Sponsors and Programs
    National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse - Grant No. 90-AM-0660, May 1998

    Keywords: Domestic violence, Support groups

    The purpose of this survey was to identify support groups that were designed specifically for older victims of abuse, to gather information about them that would be useful in assisting communities to meet the needs of elders, and to determine whether the type of sponsorship made a difference in group operations.


  9. L4483-8
    Domestic Elder Abuse and Neglect
    Wolf, R.
    From Clinical Geropsychology; Nordhus I., VandenBos, G., Berg, S., Fromholt, P., editors; American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C., 1998

    Keywords: Overview, Definitions, Older battered women, Alzheimer's/dementia

    In this chapter, the author provides a thumbnail sketch of the topic of domestic elder abuse. Discussion includes reference to (scant) prevalence studies, risk factors, and three situational scenarios of elder abuse (including abuse of the aggressive Alzheimer's patient and spousal abuse). Noted is the observation that while spousal abuse is more prevalent than abuse by adult children in the U.S., abuse by adult sons is more commonly reported to Adult Protective Services than other types of domestic elder abuse. Emphasized is the likelihood of under-reporting and the need for more research in all areas of the subject.


  10. N4762-6
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse in Domestic Settings
    PMA; November-December 1998, 8-13

    Keywords: Overview, Theories, Typologies, Physicians, Domestic violence

    In this overview, the author examines various aspects of domestic elder abuse. Definitions, theories and international prevalence/incidence studies are reviewed. Research on victim-perpetrator characteristics is described within the context of particular types of abuse and neglect. A research-based interview protocol is included and recommended as part of a routine geriatric assessment. The author proposes that the best prevention and intervention in dealing with elder abuse, and all forms of familial violence, is the fostering of an atmosphere of mutual respect and non-violent conflict resolution at even the most elemental levels of society.


  11. N4734-3
    Wolf, R.
    Caregiver Stress, Alzheimer's Disease, and Elder Abuse
    American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease; March/April 1998, 81-83

    Keywords: Alzheimer's/dementia, Caregiver stress/burden

    In this article, the author reviews a number of prominent studies that explore the relationships between dementia, caregiver stress and elder abuse. The works of Nolan (1993), Steinmetz (1988), Paveza (1992), Hamel (1990) and Coyne (1993) are discussed. The following conclusions are among those drawn: (1) abuse is more prevalent in caring relationships involving AD patients; (2) the nature of the pre-morbid relationship between caregiver and care recipient has an impact upon current dynamics and the presence of abuse; (3) aggressive behaviors on the part of some care recipients is a factor to be considered. The relationship between abuse and the degree of cognitive impairment of the care recipient, as well as the degree of dependency of the care recipient, is not as clear-cut as earlier studies had suggested.


  12. J4067-12
    Wolf, R. and Pillemer, K.
    The Older Battered Woman: Wives and Mothers Compared
    Journal of Mental Health and Aging; Vol. 3 (3) 325-336, 1997

    Keywords: Older battered women, Dependence, Shelters and services, Domestic violence

    This research explores the differences between older battered women who are victimized by their husbands and those victimized by their children. The comparison groups consisted of twenty-two women who were abused by their husbands and fifty-one abused by their adult children. While battered wives were found more likely to be dependent upon their husbands for some assistance with instrumental activities of daily living, the abusive adult children were more likely to be financially dependent upon their mothers. Other comparisons are discussed.


  13. J4115-23
    Wolf, R.
    Factors Affecting the Rate of Elder Abuse Reporting to a State Protective Services Program
    National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse - Grant No. 90-AM-0660, April 1997

    Keywords: Reporting-general, Massachusetts

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence the number of elder abuse and neglect case reports to protective services programs. Because of the great disparity in state reporting systems with respect to definitions, eligibility criteria, and organizational structure, state reporting rates could not be compared, therefore a decision was made to study intrastate variation, with Massachusetts selected as the research site. Of eleven independent variables analyzed in this study, four were significant predictors of reporting. Factors positively associated with higher rates of reporting were more training programs, higher agency service scores, and, surprisingly, a higher percentage of individuals aged sixty and older living alone. Another unexpected finding was that a higher relationship score between the protective service agency and the community was associated with lower rates of reporting.


  14. N4736-12
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse and Neglect: Causes and Consequences
    Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry; Vol. 30 (1) 153-174, 1997

    Keywords: Overview, Theories, Mental health professional, Risk assessment

    In this article, the author provides an overview of the major theoretical approaches to understanding the causes of elder mistreatment, reviews the literature on risk factors of both perpetrators and victims, and explores the psychosocial impact that may result from elder abuse and neglect. It is noted that the theoretical approach to elder abuse borrows heavily from other models of family violence theory that may be generally categorized as psychological-psychiatric, sociopsychological, and sociological or sociocultural. Among the theories highlighted are symbolic interactionism, social exchange theory, social learning theory, feminist theory, the ecological model and the political economy model. The abuser's dependency upon the victim, especially for financial support, the abuser's psychological state, the victim's poor physical and cognitive state, and the family's social isolation are discussed as the most predictive risk factors. Multidisciplinary strategies, with an emphasis on collaboration between mental health treatment and adult protective services, are required to address the complexities of elder mistreatment.


  15. N4726-3
    Wolf, R.
    Resident Abuse in Nursing Homes
    NCEA Exchange, 1997

    Keywords: Institutional care-abuse/neglect, Incidence

    This article, written for the Research Digest of the NCEA Exchange newsletter, provides an overview of four noted studies that explore the incidence of resident abuse in nursing homes in the U.S. Studies by Pillemer and Moore (1990), Payne and Cikovic (1995), Paton and colleagues (1994) and the Office of the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Health and Social Services (1990) are detailed. Collectively, the research utilized the methods of telephone surveying, interviewing of key informants, and data analysis of Ombudsman reports and cases prosecuted by the Medicaid fraud unit. The author concludes that while the existence of resident mistreatment is well documented in each of these studies, further research is required to establish a prevalence rate.


  16. N4727-8
    Wolf, R.
    Is Mandatory Reporting of Elder Abuse an Effective Intervention Strategy?
    NCEA Exchange, 1997

    Keywords: Reporting-mandatory

    This paper, part of the Research Digest series of the NCEA Exchange newsletter, is a discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of mandatory reporting of suspected elder abuse. The key findings of the Three Model Projects Study (1989), the Illinois Department on Aging demonstration project (1987), the research of Fredriksen (1989) in the Seattle area, and the U.S. General Accounting Office study (1991) are described. Among other findings, while reports of elder mistreatment increased in states with mandatory reporting legislation, the reports did not appear to be made by mandatory reporters (such as physicians) but rather by family and acquaintances. The author points out that there has been little attention in the elder abuse research on "failure to report" and discusses professional judgement, narrow versus broad perceptions of abuse, and denial on the part of the victim as issues that impact upon reporting suspected abuse.


  17. A425-6
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse and Neglect: an Update
    Reviews in Clinical Gerontology; Vol. 7 (2) 177-182, 1997

    Keywords: Overview

    This article provides an overview of the progress made in addressing elder mistreatment in domestic settings during the past five years. The author notes that research during this time period has broken little new ground, with the potential exception of Lachs' study addressing the effect of elder mistreatment on mortality. The most significant successes have come in the form of increasing global awareness of elder abuse.


  18. K4324-5
    Wolf, R
    Understanding Elder Abuse and Neglect
    Aging Magazine; No. 367, 4-9, 1996

    Keywords: Overview

    This informational article offers detailed definitions of physical, psychological and financial abuse as well as neglect. The risk factors of the various categories of abuse are discussed, as well as typical characteristics of both the perpetrator and the victim. Included is a section on incidence and prevalence rates of abuse, along with investigative techniques used by the state units on aging.


  19. N4743-9
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse and Family Violence: Testimony Presented Before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging
    Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect; Vol. 8 (1) 81-96, 1996

    Keywords: Overview, Hearing (Congress)
    (
    This testimony was presented on April 4, 1995, in Portland, Maine, at the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging Hearing entitled "Society's Secret Shame: Elder Abuse and Family Violence.") In this address, the speaker provides a summation of elder abuse as a contemporary societal problem. Among other aspects, the scope, risk factors, the response system, and ethical concerns are briefly described. In concluding, the speaker proposes recommendations for future action in nine areas, including a national reporting system, integration of services, public awareness campaigns and elder rights programs.


  20. N4735-38
    Synthesis and Dissemination of AoA Title IV Results on Elder Abuse Final Report
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant 90-AM-0717
    March 1995

    Keywords: Agency reports

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention collaborated on a project to synthesize and disseminate the results of research supported by AoA Title IV grants. This publication reports on the process of collecting and analyzing research (which culminated in the AoA Compendium of Products), synthesizing the research into content areas (which resulted in the publication of the four Elder Abuse Briefs), adapting the research into formats suitable for various disciplines, and identifying channels for dissemination of this information.


  21. K4150-120
    Wolf, R. and Nerenberg, L.
    Compendium of Products on Elder Abuse
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant No. 90-AM-0717, December 1994

    Keywords: Agency reports

    This Compendium reviews 89 products, the result of 35 grant awards covering the period 1978-1993. The reports range in length from 2 to over 800 pages (including Appendices); the products are categorized into 15 different types (manuals, research, reports, etc.). Each product has been summarized on one page of the Compendium. Basic information regarding the type, length, authors, grant # and year produced is displayed in the format along with a brief entry describing the results of the project or content of the product.


  22. I3685-15
    Wolf, R. and Nerenberg, L.
    General Introduction to Elder Abuse
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant 90-AM-0717, December 1994

    Keywords: Overview, Historical

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention collaborated on a project to synthesize and disseminate the results of research supported by AoA Title IV grants. This publication is one of four Elder Abuse Briefs that resulted from this research. This report emphasizes that despite increased awareness, a more aggressive approach is needed for the prevention of abuse and neglect. A legal resource list is included in the reference material.


  23. I3686-18
    Nerenberg, L. and Wolf, R.
    Community Outreach in Elder Abuse Prevention
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant 90-AM-0717, December 1994

    Keywords: Outreach programs

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention collaborated on a project to synthesize and disseminate the results of research supported by AoA Title IV grants. This publication is one of four Elder Abuse Briefs that resulted from this research. This article describes how the fear, shame and secrecy of elder abuse immobilizes victims. It also describes strategies for effective outreach campaign programs. A number of practical guidelines are included.


  24. I3687-15
    Nerenberg, L. and Wolf, R.
    Professional Training in Elder Abuse
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant 90-AM-0717, December 1994

    Keywords: Health care, Education /training, Nurses, Social Workers, Socio-economic status

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention collaborated on a project to synthesize and disseminate the results of research supported by AoA Title IV grants. This publication is one of four Elder Abuse Briefs that resulted from this research. This article offers strategies for training a variety of health care, social service and legal professionals in the detection and assessment of elder mistreatment.


  25. I3688-14
    Wolf, R. and Nerenberg, L.
    Guardianship
    Funded under Title IV of the Older Americans Act - Administration on Aging - Grant 90-AM-0717, December 1994

    Keywords: Guardianship

    The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention collaborated on a project to synthesize and disseminate the results of research supported by AoA Title IV grants. This publication is one of four Elder Abuse Briefs that resulted from this research. This article discusses the legal definitions of guardianship, including public guardianship, and research and recommendations on various systems.


  26. K4239-4
    Wolf, R. and Pillemer, K.
    What's New in Elder Abuse Programming? Four Bright Ideas
    The Gerontologist; Vol. 34 (1) 126-129, 1994

    Keywords: Education/training, Model programs, Agency/service coordination, Advocacy, Support groups

    This article discusses four "best practice" models that focus on problems common to many community agencies addressing elder abuse. Problems identified include the fragmented human service system, the resistance of victims to accept services, and the lack of trained staff. The San Francisco Consortium for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (a multidisciplinary team), the Senior Advocacy Volunteer Program of Wisconsin, the Victim Support Group of Mount Sinai's Elder Abuse Project, and the University of Hawaii's Master's Level Training Unit in Adult Protective Services are highlighted.


  27. J4070-8
    Wolf, R
    Victimization of the Elderly: Elder Abuse and Neglect
    Reviews in Clinical Gerontology; Vol. 2, 269-276, 1992

    Keywords: Overview, Definitions

    This paper focuses on elder abuse as defined by Hudson: "Elder mistreatment is destructive behavior which is directed toward an older adult, occurs within the context of a relationship denoting trust, and is of sufficient intensity and/or frequency to produce harmful physical, psychological, social, and/or financial effects of unnecessary suffering, injury, pain, loss, and/or violation of human rights and decreased quality of life for the older adult." It also includes discussion regarding intervention models such as multidisciplinary teams and elder abuse task forces.


  28. F3099-33
    Wolf, R. and McCarthy, E.
    Elder Abuse
    Paper prepared for Case Studies in Family Violence; Ammerman, R. and Hersen, M., editors; Plenum Press, New York, 1991
    Keyword: Overview, Legislation, Abuser profile, Victim profile, Caregiver-family, Domestic violence

    This paper begins with a brief review of the nature and scope of elder abuse, followed by an illustrative case study, and concludes with a discussion of several issues identified.


  29. N4567-4
    Wolf, R.
    Oral Testimony of Rosalie S. Wolf, Executive Director, Institute on Aging, The Medical Center of Central Massachusetts, and President, National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse
    Hearing on Elder Abuse: What Can Be Done? Presented before the Subcommittee on Human Services Select Committee on Aging, U.S. House of Representatives, May 15, 1991

    Keywords: Hearing (Congress), Reporting-general

    In her presentation, Dr. Wolf urges Congress not to require mandatory reporting of elder abuse as a condition for states to receive federal funding for elder mistreatment prevention programs. She also requests that funding be provided for a National Center for Elder Abuse Prevention within the Department of Health and Human Services under the Older Americans Act, as part of a multidisciplinary response to this problem. (The transcript of the entire hearing is in CANE holdings under file # G3258-154.)


  30. A455-18
    Wolf, R. and McCarthy, E.
    Elder Abuse
    From Growing Old in America; 4th edition, Hess, B. and Markson, E., editors; Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ, 1991

    Keywords: Overview, Adult protective services, Autonomy

    At the heart of this overview is a case study that illustrates the complexities of addressing elder abuse. The story of an eighty-eight year old widow and her abusive adult son is described, from the reporting of suspected abuse, assessments, service planning, coordination and implementation, and the ongoing monitoring of the client's status. The need to respect the client's autonomy while offering assistance, and protection from further abuse and neglect, is a theme that runs throughout the discussion.


  31. F3100-13
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse - Perpetrators of Maltreatment
    From Treatment of Family Violence: A Sourcebook; Ammerman, R. and Hersen, M., editors; John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1990

    Keywords: Physical abuse, Psychological abuse, Financial abuse/fiduciary, Neglect, Abuser profile

    This paper explores research that has been conducted throughout the past decade on perpetrators of elder abuse. Profiles outlined include impaired spouses, stressed caregivers, dependent adult children and avaricious friends. The author recommends that prevention and intervention strategies addressing perpetrator behaviors may prove more effective in dealing with elder mistreatment.


  32. N4772-7
    Wolf, R.
    Elder Abuse: Scope, Characteristics, and Treatment
    Nurse Practitioner Forum; Vol. 1 (2), 102-108, September, 1990
    Overview, Nurses, Victim profile, Perpetrator profile

    In this overview, the author discusses the evolving concept of elder abuse in terms of research, definitions, theories, interventions and areas for future consideration. In reviewing the findings of the research during the past twelve years, including a shift from a focus on victim characteristics to perpetrator characteristics, the needed changes in interventions and service delivery are outlined. Among the practical tools for identification and treatment of elder abuse discussed are the Elder Abuse Diagnosis and Intervention Model (Quinn and Tomita), the "inadequate care" framework (Fulmer and O'Malley), and the Staircase Model.


  33. E2730-10
    Godkin, M., Wolf, R., and Pillemer, K.
    A Case Comparison Analysis of Elder Abuse and Neglect
    International Journal of Aging and Human Development; Vol. 28 (3) 207-225, 1989

    Keywords: Theories, Risk assessment, Incidence, Socio-economic status

    This study examines the factors affecting caregivers that contribute to elder abuse and neglect in domestic situations. Fifty-nine abused elders from a model project site were compared with forty-nine non-abused clients from the same agency. Interpersonal difficulties, social isolation, and interdependence between victim and abuser are among the issues explored.


  34. C1711-14
    Wolf, R.
    Spouse Abuse and Neglect in the Aging Family
    From Stress, Conflict and Abuse of the Elderly; Wolf, R. and Bergman, S., editors; Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Adult Development, Jerusalem, 1989

    Keywords: Domestic violence, Intervention, Older battered women

    This article discusses spouse abuse and neglect in aging families. Various studies are described to discuss the causes and characteristics of spouse abuse and neglect. The chapter concludes with a framework for approaching intervention and prevention.


  35. F3028-14
    Wolf, R.
    Hearings on Elder Abuse: An Assessment of the Federal Response
    Testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives - Subcommittee on Human Services Select Committee on Aging, June 7, 1989

    Keywords: Hearings (Congress), Legislation-federal

    This address outlines the progress made in dealing with the problem of elder abuse and neglect throughout the past decade. The purpose of the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and state efforts are highlighted. The risk factors that have recently been identified in research are discussed as significant in the development of successful intervention and prevention programs.


  36. N4740-16
    Wolf, R. and Pillemer, K.
    Helping Elderly Victims - The Reality of Elder Abuse - Introducing the Issues; Columbia University Press, New York, 1989

    Keywords: Overview, Model programs, Definitions, Book

    This is the Preface and Introduction to Helping Elderly Victims - The Reality of Elder Abuse. This book provides an overview on the topic of elder abuse while presenting a comparative evaluation of three different intervention models: the service brokerage model of the Elder Home Care Services of Worcester, Massachusetts; the coordination model of the Metropolitan Commission on Aging in Syracuse, New York; and the mandatory reporting model of the Rhode Island Department of Elderly Affairs. Funded in the early 1980's by the AoA, the Model Projects were designed to explore the extent of elder mistreatment in a geographic location, to identify existing responses to the problem, to demonstrate improvements in reporting, investigation and prevention of elder mistreatment, and to develop social and legal restorative interventions for victims. Using data from over three hundred cases of abuse and neglect, the authors discuss definitions, risk factors, sources of conflict, and effectiveness of interventions. Please note that the book is unavailable from CANE; this entry includes the Table of Contents, Preface, Introduction and Bibliography. (Out of print since 1998.)


  37. A410-12
    Pillemer, K., MacAdam, M. and Wolf, R.
    Services to Families with Dependent Elders
    Journal of Aging & Social Policy; Vol. 1 (3/4), 67-89, 1989

    Keywords: Caregiver, Home care

    This article focuses on the assistance that states can provide to family caregivers of dependent elders. The Massachusetts Home Care Program is highlighted as an example of a community based program that identifies and delivers services to the most needy while providing support for families. Financial incentives such as tax credits, stipends and service vouchers, as well as homemaker, respite, adult day care services and counseling and education programs, are among the interventions considered.


  38. N4739-12
    Elder Abuse - Conflict in the Family - Introduction
    Pillemer, K. and Wolf, R., editors; Auburn House Publishing Co., Dover, MA, 1986

    Keywords: Overview (book), Book

    In this Introduction, the editors outline the purpose and the structure of this volume. Divided into three sections, the book first provides an overview of intergenerational late-life family conflict from the sociological, psychological, historical and literary perspectives. The second section provides a discussion of research on the topic of elder abuse and the problems encountered throughout the process thus far. The final segment focuses on intervention and policy development. The Introduction summarizes each chapter. In addition to the introduction, this packet includes the table of contents as well as profiles on the fifteen contributing authors, including the editors, Hudson, Johnson, Phillips and Cicirelli. (The book is available through Auburn Publishing Company, Dover, MA).


  39. N4771-11
    Wolf, R. and Bergman, S., editors
    Stress, Conflict and Abuse of the Elderly
    JDC-Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Adult Human Development, Jerusalem, 1989

    Keywords: Book, Cultural, Overview

    This entry contains the introduction and table of contents of Stress, Conflict and Abuse of the Elderly, a monograph that is a collection of papers presented at a workshop held at the Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Adult Human Development in Jerusalem on August 25-27, 1986. One of a series of international workshops commemorating the founding of organized gerontology in Israel, it represents one of the first attempts to consider elder abuse within a cross-cultural context. (Note: The book, which is divided into three sections [General Issues; The Victim; Care and Services], is not available through CANE.)


  40. D2377-8
    Wolf, R.
    The Evolution of Policy: A 10-Year Retrospective
    Public Welfare; Vol. 46 (2) 7-13, Spring 1988

    Keywords: Legislation-federal, Reporting-voluntary

    In the last decade, national elder abuse legislation has failed repeatedly. Differences in definitions and data collection methods have hampered efforts to understand the problem. The author proposes that in order to plan and budget for services effectively, a national voluntary reporting system should be devised. The article includes a comprehensive summary of federal efforts to pass elder abuse legislation to date.


  41. D2508-84
    Wolf, R. and McMurray-Anderson, S.
    Project Idea: Information Dissemination about Elderly Abuse
    University Center on Aging, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, February, 1988
    Funded in part by the Administration on Aging - Grant No. 90AM1055/01

    Keywords: Education/training, Legislative issues, Overview

    This is the final report of Project IDEA. The purpose of the project was to disseminate information about elder abuse to practitioners, planners, educators and trainers, administrators, policy makers, and social scientists throughout the country to enable them to deal more effectively with this problem. The report reviews the status of state and federal activities regarding elder abuse and neglect, existing research-based knowledge, and programs of information dissemination and training. It also includes a service needs assessment


  42. F3098-13
    Intervention, Outcome, and Elder Abuse
    Wolf, R. and Pillemer, K.
    From Coping with Family Violence; Holaling, Finkelhor, Kirkpatrick and Strauss, editors; Sage Publishers, Newport Park, CA, 1988

    Keywords: Evaluation, Model programs, Intervention

    This chapter summarizes intervention strategies and organizational issues related to service delivery in dealing with elder abuse. The results of the 1980 Model Projects (from Worcester, MA; Syracuse, New York, and Rhode Island) are discussed in order to illustrate points of comparison among various service delivery styles.


  43. N4773-11
    Wolf, R.
    Issues in Geriatric/Gerontological Education
    From Realistic Expectations for Long-Life; Lesnoff-Caravaglia, G., editor; Human Sciences Press, Inc., New York, NY, 1987
    Health care, Ageism, Training/education, Historical

    In this chapter, the author chronicles the development of the study of gerontology in the United States. While formal education began to introduce courses on social gerontology in the 1940's, aging as a course of study was not documented in the field of health care until the 1960's. The impact of ageism upon students and faculty is discussed as one barrier to gerontological education. Interdisciplinary training and the use of the long-term care setting are also discussed as methods to enhance geriatric education


  44. E2891-4
    Wolf, R., Godkin, M. and Pillemer, K.
    Maltreatment of the Elderly: A Comparative Analysis
    Pride Institute Journal of Long-Term Home Health Care; Vol. 5 (4) 10-17, Fall 1986

    Keywords: Incidence, Victim profile, Abuser profile, Typologies

    This article presents the results of a study that attempts to identify the perpetrator and victim characteristics associated with different types of abuse and neglect. The sample consisted of 328 perpetrator-victim pairs. Results suggest that different victim or perpetrator factors contribute to the type of abuse or neglect experienced.


  45. N4742-9
    Wolf, R., Halas, K., Green, L. and McNiff, M.
    A Model for the Integration of Community-Based Health and Social Services
    Home Health Care Services Quarterly; Vol. 6 (4) 41-57, Winter 1985/86

    Keywords: Model programs, Home care

    This article reports on the results and implications of an experimental-control study involving the Integrated Continuing Care Program (ICCP). This model program, funded by a nine-month grant from the Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs, coordinated the services of the Visiting Nurses Association (VNA) and the Elder Home Care Services (EHC) of Worcester. It was designed to provide a unified client care plan and integrated services for both home and personal care, particularly by combining homemaker and health care tasks to be performed by one paraprofessional. The sample consisted of thirty-five clients in the experimental group and thirty-five clients in the traditional service group. The comparison of average monthly expense per client demonstrated a 12% savings for the integrated service model. The response to the program's quality was positive, and referrals for adjunctive services (mental health, socialization, etc.) also increased.


  46. A650-18
    Wolf, R., Godkin, M. and Pillemer, K.
    Elder Abuse and Neglect: Final Report from Three Model Projects (Executive Summary)
    University Center on Aging, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, December, 1984
    Funded in part by the Administration on Aging, Award No. 01AM000018, through the Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs

    Keywords: Agency reports, Intervention, Education/training

    This is the executive summary of the final report of the AoA funded Three Model Projects. Major issues addressed in the report include definitions, scope, predictors of elder abuse, the effectiveness of intervention models, education and training efforts to date, and implications for future research.


  47. B1071-412
    Wolf, R., Godkin, M. and Pillemer, K.
    Elder Abuse and Neglect: Final Report from the Three Model Projects (Findings)
    University Center on Aging, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, December, 1984
    Funded in part by the Administration on Aging, Award No. 01AM000018, through the Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs

    Keywords: Government (reports, publications), Intervention, Evaluation, Community agencies

    This 412-page publication is the final report of an AoA-funded project, established in 1980. The major components of the project were: evaluation of three intervention / protective services models; surveys of community agencies; assessment of abuse / neglect cases; in depth interviews with victims; and case studies from the programs. Extensive analysis of results and recommendations are contained within the report.


  48. B1077-68
    Pillemer, K. and Wolf, R.
    Organizational Assessment of the Delivery of Protective Services to Abused and Neglected Elders at Two Massachusetts Home Care Corporations
    University Center on Aging, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA., January, 1983
    Funded under Title IV-C grant from the Administration on Aging to Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs

    Keywords: Adult Protective Service, Evaluation, Case management, Community agencies

    This report assesses two distinct protective services models; it constitutes exhibit 2 in "Elder Abuse and Neglect: Final Report from Three Model Projects." The evaluation addresses case management, interagency coordination, and replicability of the models.


  49. B1076-106
    Wolf, R., Strugnell, C. and Godkin
    Preliminary Findings from Three Model Projects on Elderly Abuse
    University Center on Aging, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA., December, 1982
    Funded in part by Title IV-C of the Older Americans Act under grants from the Administration on Aging

    Keywords: Overview, Intervention, Evaluation, Agency reports

    This is a preliminary report on an AoA funded project and Exhibit I of the Final Report. It provides background information on the projects, a review of the literature, study methodology, and results from individual case reports and agency reports.


  50. N4569-26
    Pillemer, K. and Wolf, R.
    Domestic Violence Against the Elderly: Who Depends on Whom? What Difference Does it Make?
    Presented as part of a series of reports from the "Evaluation of Four Model Elder Abuse Projects," funded by the Florence V. Burden Foundation and the Ittleson Foundation (date unknown).

    Keywords: Caregiver stress/burden, Abuser profile, Victim profile, Theories

    In this paper, the authors cite studies that refute the notion that elder abuse is typically the result of caregiver burden. Dependency, or impairment, on the part of the victim is not demonstrated as a common factor among abuse victims, despite popular assumptions due to early research. There is a growing awareness that abusers tend to be more dependent upon victims and to have demonstrated such characteristics as histories of violence, substance abuse, involvement with the criminal justice system, and psychiatric hospitalizations. Therefore, the authors recommend the development of interventions geared towards perpetrators.

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